In recent months, Flamengo has flirted with the dream of having its own stadium and is definitely moving towards having a stadium to call its own. Rodolfo Landim, the current president of the club, is working behind the scenes to make this dream come true and defends joining the SAF project as the best way to start the project. […]

13 dec
2023
– 07:04

(update at 7:04)




Flamengo president Rodolfo Landim

Photo: Marcelo Cortes/CRF/Esporte News Mundo

In recent months, Flamengo has flirted with the dream of having its own stadium and is definitely moving towards having a stadium to call its own. Rodolfo Landim, the current president of the club, is working behind the scenes to make this dream come true and defends joining the SAF project as the best way to start the project. Landim resembles Bayern Munich's SAF, but expert advises caution when trying to bring a foreign project to Brazil

Tiago Gomes, partner at Ambiel Advogados and Master of Commercial Law, when asked about the project that Flamengo intends to implement in the future, argues that the foreign economic and associational culture is completely different from the one that prevails here in Brazil.

Firstly, it is important to emphasize that Landim, in promoting his project to his allies, argues that unlike what was done here in Brazil with SAF, Flamengo would still have total decision-making power within the club. Landim intends to sell only small parts to companies, and this investment will generate money for the construction of the stadium.

Secondly, Tiago Gomes, Brazilian culture may not be conducive to the project that Landim intends to implement at Flamengo. Look;

“The German system clearly stipulates that associations will retain 50% of the shares in football associations, which is not the case here. And this is due to the cultural issue of post-war German corporate law with the influence of co-management,” says Tiago

This means that minority shareholders have real decision-making power and can contribute more than just money

Talking about the Brazilian scenario, Tiago explains that a change in the political groups in power could end up disrupting the management of the companies that will be partners in the project. In Brazil, corporate law developed as a result of strong economic concentration, which led to the concentration of power in the hands of company controllers. Unlike the German system, it often focuses on the interests of the majority shareholder, with certain protections limited to the rights of minority shareholders.

Landim and his allies will need to get the SAF project right at Flamengo to be able to present it to other companies. Today, the club's financial and sporting dynamics are an attraction that speaks for itself. However, for a project of this size, every detail is important to avoid future problems.

Talks with potential project partners are, however, a bit distant, as Flamengo is still in dialogue with Caixa Econômica Federal, which owns the land on which the Rio club intends to build a stadium.

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